Catheterisation

Catheterisation
 
 
Clean Intermittent Catheterisation for Children 
 
Clean Intermittent Catheterisation is a technique which is used to empty the bladder at regular intervals. 
 
This is done by passing a catheter (small tube) into the bladder through the urethra (passage through which urine leaves the bladder). You should be taught how to do this by your continence nurse. Although it is not a sterile technique, it is clean. It is very important to have good hygiene standards when doing the procedure.
 
There are lots of catheters available. If the catheter is ‘self-lubricated', it means that after it is soaked in water for a short time it becomes slippery enough to insert. Some catheters are pre-lubricated, which means they have a slippery coating on them. With others, you will need to use a lubricating jelly to ease insertion. Your continence nurse will tell you how to use each type of catheter.
 
Catheters are available on prescription from your doctor. Some chemists will have to order the catheters for you, so make sure you have enough catheters to last while waiting for your next order to come in.
 
Clean Self-Intermittent Catheterisation for Adults
 
Clean Intermittent Self-Catheterisation is a technique which is used to empty the bladder at regular intervals. 
 
This is done by passing a catheter (small tube) into the bladder through the urethra (passage through which urine leaves the bladder). You should be taught how to do this by your continence nurse. Although it is not a sterile technique, it is clean. It is very important to have good hygiene standards when doing the procedure.
 
There are lots of catheters available. If the catheter is ‘self-lubricated’, it means that after it is soaked in water for a short time it becomes slippery enough to insert. Some catheters are pre-lubricated, which means they have a slippery coating on them. With others, you will need to use a lubricating jelly to ease insertion. Your continence nurse will tell you how to use each type of catheter.
 
Catheters are available on prescription from your doctor. Some chemists will have to order the catheters for you, so make sure you have enough catheters to last while waiting for your next order to come in. Many healthcare companies offer a home delivery service, whereby you send the prescription to the company and they send the catheters to your home. Ask your SBHI Family Support Worker for more details.
 
Most catheters nowadays are ‘single use’. However, some people may need to use reusable catheters. A reusable catheter must be rinsed, dried, and stored in a clean paper bag immediately after each use. You will need to change the bags and catheter at least once a week.
Your doctor or continence nurse will tell you how many times a day you will need to catheterise yourself. It can vary from once a day for some people, to 4-6 times a day for others.
 
Most people find it easiest to catheterise whilst sitting on the toilet.
 
Procedure
  • List of equipment
  • Catheter
  • Mirror - may be useful for females
  • Lubricating/anaesthetic jelly for males if used
  • Disposable tissues - or baby wipes
  • Non-perfumed soap - the perfumed type may cause irritation
  • Towel - kept for this purpose only
  • Container for urine if not drained directly into the toilet
  • Floor protection
  • Very careful hygiene should be observed at all times

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